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What To Expect From The Conservative Party Conference

The Conservative party conference takes place at the International Convention Centre in Birmingham. It will run from Sunday, September 30 until Wednesday, October 3. There are expected to be 100 stands, 450 events and 11,000 people.

All eyes will be on Theresa May when she gives her keynote address on the last day. It comes at a tough time for the Prime Minister after European leaders rejected her chequer’s Brexit plan.

Who will be speaking?

The conference will start with party chairman Brandon Lewis providing the “Welcome to conference” speech on Sunday afternoon. Then followed by the addresses of the following secretaries; international trade Liam Fox, international defence Penny Mordaunt, defence Gavin Williamson and foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt.

On Monday, work and pensions secretary Esther McVey, Brexit secretary Dominic Raab, transport secretary Chris Grayling will address the auditorium. Followed by a Phillip Hammond speech on “An economy that works for everyone”.

The afternoon session will be focused on “An Opportunity for Future Generations” and feature speeches by cabinet ministers Michael Gove, Jeremy Wright, James Brokenshire and Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson.

On Tuesday 2 October, Northern Ireland secretary Karen Bradley, Welsh secretary Alun Cairns, Scottish secretary David Mundell and justice secretary David Gauke will speak on “A Stronger, Fairer United Kingdom”.

After lunch, the issue of “High-Quality Public Services” will be tackled by health secretary Matt Hancock and education secretary Damian Hinds, among others. 

Wednesday morning will leave the stage open for Theresa May to have the ‘final say’ of the conference. The Prime Minister will make her keynote speech around 10am.

Other speakers will include former UKIP Member of the European Parliament Steven Woolfie, former international development secretary Priti Patel and Brexiteer Sir Bill Cash.

 

Similarly to the Labour Party conference in Liverpool earlier this week, anti-Brexit campaigners could protest outside the conference. The presence of West Midlands streets will be greater than usual especially in the vicinity of the ICC and City centre. Undoubtedly there will be protests from ‘final say’ campaigners that want a second referendum on Britain’s exit from Europe.

For anyone travelling to the conference or around the area, there will be travel restrictions in place on Broad Street, Bridge Street and Cambridge Street until October 5th.

 

 

 

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